Mujeres Mágicas

Las Malcriadas
Domestic Workers Right to Write
A bilingual anthology edited and translated by Karina Muñiz-Pagán and Argelia Muñoz Larroa

List Price: $20

 

Publication Date: July 26, 2019.
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Mujeres Mágicas is a brave, moving, and powerful collection that carries us inside the lives and truths of Latina immigrant women, narrated on their own terms. Over and over, I found myself floored and moved by the courage, pain, resilience, and insight found in these pages. This book is essential reading, beautifully woven, and an enormous gift.  Carolina de Robertis, Author of Cantoras and the Gods of Tango 

This luminous blend of poems and essays from leaders within the domestic workers movement reveal the universal power of story and storytelling. Through childhood memories, life at the border and building political power here in the US, I was touched by the strength, awareness and vulnerability the writers brought to the page. An inspiring must-read.  Ai-Jen Poo,  Executive Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance

I can think of no other book cutting through the rhetoric of hate to speak truth to power in the ways that have been enacted by Mujeres Mágicas. This is literature at its most immediate, urgent, and necessary existence in our world. This is resistance. I celebrate these women, their words, and their lives. I celebrate this book as it tears through the fabric of these dark times. Truong Tran, Visual artist and poet

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About Las Malcriadas

Some Information

Las Malcriadas are a group of writers who met in writing workshops sponsored by Mujeres Unidas y Activas and facilitated by editor Karina Muñiz-Pagán

The name of the group, Las Malcriadas, emerged from a story written in the workshop, and featured in this anthology. Malcriada often means bad-mannered, rebellious, and unladylike. In the story, the young girl questions why she has to do so many chores while her brother gets to play.

The book we have created was inspired by this quote from Gloria Anzaldúa’s “Letter to Third World Women”

“Rewrite the stories others have miswritten about me, about you... I say mujer mágica, empty yourself. Shock yourself into new ways of perceiving the world, shock your readers into the same. Write with your eyes like painters, with your ears like musicians, with your feet like dancers. You are the truthsayer with quill and torch. Write with your tongues of fire. Don't let the pen banish you from yourself.”