Essays

Magnicide?

Clifton Ross
Bush mafia would like to murder Chavez; their savagery know no limits

VHeadline
guest commentator Clifton Ross writes: I'm afraid most of my reflections at this point will be made by a novice in the Bolivarian process, but here they are for what they're worth. For the most part I'm not even competent to do more than reflect at this point, that is, mirror what I'm seeing, echo what I'm hearing.
Related items:

Clifton Ross on Agroecology

I'm posting information here, clips and essays, related to my next movie on Agroecology.
Related items:

Clifton Ross on South America

Here is where you'll see my historical archive and current posts on Venezuela and where you can also see and order my movie.
Related items:

Not by Bread Alone

B. Jesse Clarke
A Perspective on the Tenderloin Reflection Education Center
In 1981, a group of activists associated with the Franciscan peace and justice movement came together in San Francisco's Tenderloin to create a reflection and education center that would "take into account the perspectives of the underside of history, the experiences and struggles of the 'jagged edge'-- all those in our society who are not treated as full human beings." Beginning with a Bible discussion group organized on the model of liberation theology activists in Latin America, the Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center has evolved into one of the Bay area's longest lived cultural and spiritual organizations of and for homeless and dispossessed persons.

Related items:

September 11 and the U.S.War; Beyond the Curtain of Smoke

Edited By Roger Burbach and Ben Clarke

Published by City Lights and Freedom Voices

Essays providing the essential information needed to understand the origins and consequences of the September 11 attacks, US policies in the Middle East and Southwest Asia and strategies for organizing resistance to the U.S. war.

Related items:

Don't Abandon Us!

Zapatista National Liberation Army--EZLN
Interview conducted by Matilde Pérez and Laura Castellanos, published in La Jornada's special supplement for International Women's Day, March 7, 1994 Translated by Clifton Ross.

"Don't abandon us!" is the desperate cry of the women of the Zapatista National Liberation Army, hoping that their cry to be heard, both within and beyond their communities, won't die.

Related items:

TREC History

A Report on the Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center

The Tenderloin Reflection and Education Center (TREC) has long been a model community organization for political activism and organization.

Related items:

Until We Are Strong Together: Women Writers in the Tenderloin

Caroline E. Heller

PROLOGUE

IT TURNED INTO SOMETHING TRUE TO YOU
I lived an ordinary life among down-to-earth routines. And yet I felt two things very strongly: I felt, however ordinary those routines, that I stood at the Iyric center of my experience, and that I wished to make a visionary claim for that experience.
Eavan Boland, "When the Sprit Moves"

Related items:

The Street Writer's Manifesto

George Wynn
I bring to your notice that I exist to chronicle the plight of the outsider. With this affirmation the street writer joins the humanistic community in striving to improve social conditions. It does not matter whether the writer is a beginner or experienced. What matters is that you sit entranced over your journal. It will do you good. After concentrated reflection, the street writer, with pen or pencil, must advocate a charged passion for the homeless and the underclass.

Related items:

Encounters with the Photography of Dorothea Lange; Introduction by Ben Clarke

Ben Clarke
Dorothea Lange, one of the founders of documentary photography, is best known for her Depression Era work for the Farm Security Administration. Her iconic portrait, the Migrant Mother, has been reproduced thousands of times. Her moving images of Midwestern farm families forced off the land by drought and the corporate takeover of farming were used in the struggle to establish government social programs and collective bargaining rights for workers in the thirties.
Related items:
Syndicate content