Essays

20th Anniversary: Voice of Fire: Communiques and Interviews From the Zapatista National Liberation Army

Ben Clarke
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Voice of Fire

Communiques and Interviews from the Zapatista National Liberation Army

Edited by Ben Clarke and Clifton Ross

"Voice of Fire presents the critical communiqués and perspectives of the first guerrilla movement to emerge in Latin America in the post-Cold War era. This book puts us inside the minds of Indigenous peoples and Mexicans who are raising fundamental questions about the current political and social order in North America. Subcomandante Marcos' commentaries are written with a passion and commitment reminiscent of Eduardo Galeano's Open Veins of Latin America."
Roger Burbach
Author of Fire in the Americas

"The Zapatistas bring much needed fresh ideas to the world's progressive and indigenous rights movements. Their civil society strategy, which rejects both vanguardism and narrow ethnic nationalism, appears to have been remarkably successful in a short period of time. This collection of their own writings is a must read for anyone concerned with Mexico in particular and progressive movements in general."
Peter Rossett, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Institute for Food and Development Policy

"The spectacular January first EZLN uprising was a cry 500 years in the making. It has unleashed a torrent of discontent that will mark the unraveling of the ruling party's stranglehold on Mexican politics for the past six decades. The future face of Mexico is as unknown as the faces behind the rebel's masks, but the chiseled features of Mexico's Indians will no longer be merely reminders of the past. Thanks to the EZLN, they will now shape Mexico's future. This collection of EZLN writings is key to understanding what that future holds."
Medea Benjamin
Co-Director, Global Exchange

"If the lie returns to the mouth of the powerful our voice of fire will speak again..."
Communiqué of the EZLN, February 16,1994

Introduction by Ben Clarke : An overview of the Zapatista philosophy and origins.

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Hobos to Street People

Art Hazelwood
Artists’ Responses to Homelessness from the New Deal to the Present


$25.95 Comment: 

Hobos to Street People offers a comparison of the culture and politics of homelessness as seen through artwork since the Great Depression. The book is based on the touring exhibition of the same name that first opened in early 2009-the time of the greatest economic downturn since the 1929 Stock Market Crash. As the numbers of people living in poverty continues to swell, this book looks to the past for lessons for today. A wide range of artists have brought attention to the issue, including historical figures such as Rockwell Kent, Fritz Eichenberg, Jacob Burck, Dorothea Lange and contemporary artists Kiki Smith, Sandow Birk, Eric Drooker and many more. The text, written by artist and curator Art Hazelwood, places the artwork within the history of social and political responses from the New Deal, through McCarthyism, to the rise of modern homelessness in the 1980s. Sections of the book focus on different aspects of homelessness including day to day life, displacement, rural poverty and political struggle. Emphasis is also given to the means by which artists have been able to get their message out whether through publications, government programs of the New Deal, street posters, exhibitions, or alliances with activist groups. 

A portion of the proceeds from the sales of the books will be donated to homeless advocacy groups. Donors can direct the donation using the comment box above. (enter: WRAP, COH or Spirit)

The book is based on the traveling exhibition of the same name.The exhibition began at the California Historical Society in San Francisco in February of 2009. California Exhibition Resources Alliance (CERA)  is the touring company. The next exhibition date for the tour will be listed below if/when scheduled.

The exhibition images can be seen online at Western Regional Advocacy Project.

Reviews of 'Hobos':

The Never Ending Tale: Images of Despair and Hope from the Great Depression to the Great Recession
by: Paul Von Blum on November 29th, 2011
Tikkun Daily

Hobos to Street People: Artists’ Responses to Homelessness from the New Deal to the Present
by: Harvey Smith

Hobos to Street People: Artists Uncover Hidden History of Poverty
by: Margot Pepper, on September 1, 2011
Street Spirit

Homelessness in Art from the New Deal to the Present
by: DeWitt Cheng on September 1, 2011
Street Spirit

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William Everson: The Light the Shadow Casts

Clifton Ross

Selected Everson Poems and Five Interviews by Clifton Ross

In this collection of interviews with one of the central poets of the San Francisco Literary Renaissance (which preceded the Beat movement) William Everson/Brother Antoninus ponders the mystical dimensions of poetry. The interviews span the final fifteen years of his life and contain his final thoughts on the prophetic, the shamanistic and the aesthetic dimensions of his craft, as well as his own life, characterized by the Portuguese proverb that “God writes straight with crooked lines.” The interviews, accompanied by selected poems, were conducted, edited and introduced by Clifton Ross and were first published two years after the poets death by Stride Publications, UK, republished by Freedom Voices to honor the centennial of the poet’s birth. $14.95

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Image and Imagination

Ben Clarke, Editor; Photographer, Dorothea Lange

Writer-in-residence at the Oakland Museum of California and the Oakland Public Library, Ben Clarke, re-examines Dorothea Lange's photographs along with collaborating artists including: A.K. Black, Scott Braley, Lucha Corpi, Kitty Costello, Maketa Groves, Richard Oyama, Margot Pepper, Eric Robertson, Clifton Ross, Abena Songbird, and Rhett Stuart. Using poetry, personal essay, rap and contemporary photography the artists explore the intersection between Lange's documentary photography and current realities.

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Art and Activism: 1930s and Today

Art Hazelwood

Paul Boden
Organizing Director, Western Regional Advocacy Project
and 
Art Hazelwood 
author of Hobos to Street People

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More with Less

Eric Robertson

            Do More with Less

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OccuPant Rant

Eric Robertson

            I just returned from Occupy Oakland in downtown. What can I say? It is not immediately inspiring. Not clean. A bit muddy. Lots of straggly dressed youth mixed with older street people, radicals, liberals, anarchist kids with black rags covering their faces flying black flags. But there is order in the chaos. There is an excitement in the people there who are building community. (Remember that thing that we used to think we were a part of and then gave up on it when everything didn’t go the way we wanted.)           

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